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30 Days of Savings Sale on Christian Books!

Coming September 8 – October 7

RAKE IN THE SAVINGS!

30 Days of Savings Book Sale

 

30 Days of Savings from John 316 authors

Starting Sept. 8, the John 3:16 Marketing Network of  Authors are having a 30 day sale designed to bring you savings.  Each  author will have a one day only sale on either print or eBooks–and I’m participating, too!

 

30 Days and 30 Sales! Almost  every type of genre will be featured, including children’s books.

 

PLUS you will have a chance to win one of three $50 Amazon gift cards by keeping up with the sale. (Scroll down for entry form.)

 

On September 24, I will be offering the Kindle version of Summer’s Winter for FREE on Amazon.

 

 

Summer’s Winter is a love story wrapped in a mystery, about a preacher's daughter named Jeanine and her obsession with movie star Jamie. At the age of ten, Jeanine believed that God Himself whispered to her in a dark movie theater and promised that the young star would someday be a part of her life. So began an eleven-year test of faith as Jeanine waited for her knight to arrive and rescue her from boring middle Georgia. And then, just as she’s graduating college and about to settle into the dreary nine-to-five life that stretches ahead of her, Jamie bursts into her life in an amazing way. He even seems to be falling for her, just as she’d dreamed. Trouble is, loving Jamie is nothing like she expected. Instead of carrying her away on a white charger, he’s hiding out in Georgia following the suspicious death of his former girlfriend. Jeanine longs to prove his innocence and get at the truth. Unless she can, Jamie’s dark secrets may shatter her faith—and her life.

Summer’s Winter is a love story wrapped in a mystery, about a preacher’s daughter named Jeanine and her obsession with movie star Jamie. At the age of ten, Jeanine believed that God Himself whispered to her in a dark movie theater and promised that the young star would someday be a part of her life. So began an eleven-year test of faith as Jeanine waited for her knight to arrive and rescue her from boring middle Georgia. And then, just as she’s graduating college and about to settle into the dreary nine-to-five life that stretches ahead of her, Jamie bursts into her life in an amazing way. He even seems to be falling for her, just as she’d dreamed. Trouble is, loving Jamie is nothing like she expected. Instead of carrying her away on a white charger, he’s hiding out in Georgia following the suspicious death of his former girlfriend. Jeanine longs to prove his innocence and get at the truth. Unless she can, Jamie’s dark secrets may shatter her faith—and her life.

 

Following me, on September 25, will be Elizabeth Paige, offering He’s Looking for a Bride: Preparing the Bride of Christ for Holy Intimacy with Jesus on sale for $.99 in Kindle  format.

 

The fun all starts at www.interviewsandreviews.com on September 8, so don’t forget to mark your calendar! You can also visit inspiredfictionbooks.com for a complete listing of books on sale and sale dates.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

MAKE SURE YOU DON’T MISS THESE GREAT BARGAINS FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS!

 

 

Lorilyn Roberts http://tinyurl.com/nfycube Sept. 8
Michelle D. Evans www.michelledennisevans.com Sept. 9
Cheryl Cowell http://CherylColwell.com Sept. 10
Laura J. Davis http://tinyurl.com/poprjpp Sept. 11
Judy Lair http://tinyurl.com/ocgn8up Sept. 12
Krystal Kuehn http://tinyurl.com/oxg4nat Sept. 13
Violet James http://tinyurl.com/oxg4nat Sept. 14
Emma Right http://emmaright.com/special-offer-month Sept. 15
Pearl Nsiah-Kumi www.pearlkumi.net Sept. 16
Randy Kirk http://godcalled-isaiah6.com/ Sept. 17
William Burt http://bit.ly/15lNmKQ Sept. 18
Kimberley Payne http://www.kimberleypayne.com/30-days-of-savings/ Sept. 19
Cheryl Colwell www.cherylcolwell.com Sept. 20
D.K. Drake www.DragonStalkers.com Sept. 21
Jill Richardson http://jill-theimperfectjourney.blogspot.com Sept. 22
Dana Rongione http://www.danarongione.com/30-days-of-savings.html Sept. 23
Robin Johns Grant http://robinjohnsgrant.com/30-days-savings/ Sept. 24
Elizabeth Paige www.moldableclay.com Sept. 25
L. Shoshana Rhodes http://messianicpropheticintercessor.com/ Sept. 26
Michelle D. Evans www.michelledennisevans.com Sept. 27
Sharon A. Lavy www.sharonalavy.com Sept. 28
Lorilyn Roberts http://LorilynRoberts.com/special_edition.html Sept. 29
Dana Rongione http://danarongione.com Sept.30
William Burt http://bit.ly/1pBhdyO Oct. 1
Laura J. Davis http://tinyurl.com/poprjpp Oct. 2
Kimberley Payne http://www.KimberleyPayne.com/30-days-of-savings/ Oct. 3
Emma Right http://emmaright.com/special-offer-month Oct. 4
Val Newton Knowles www.valnewtonknowles.com Oct. 5
Elizabeth Paige www.moldableclay.com/ Oct. 6
Jilll Richardson http://jill-theimperfectjourney.blogspot.com/ Oct. 7

 

Read more at http://www.lorilynroberts.com/savings.html#0GQbAPCQpqYYrQhr.99

 

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Self-Publishing Explosion: Good or Bad for Readers?

Reading a Kindle in the beautiful sunshine.
Reading a Kindle in the beautiful sunshine. Used under Creative Commons License from tripu on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tripu/8661744360/

I keep reading about the huge shift that’s happening in the publishing world, mainly due to the explosion of indie books. One figure said there are at least 3,500 books being published in the U.S. every day, and that figure isn’t complete because not all of the self-published books will have an ISBN and be counted.

Usually I hear discussions of what this means to authors—whether they can make more money self-publishing than with a traditional contract, whether they should jump on board the self-publishing train, how they should tackle the marketing.

But I started wondering…just what does this self-publishing explosion mean for readers, for the people who need to decide where to spend their precious book money?

Partially it depends on where you buy your books. If you still mainly get your books from a physical bookstore or a library, you may be missing the publishing revolution altogether. It’s still deadly hard for an indie author to get their work into those physical venues, for a variety of reasons. But if this describes you, did you know you’re in a very small minority—that most people buy their books online these days?

And the biggest retailer by far is, of course, Amazon.

So if you buy from Amazon or another online retailer—whether ebooks or print—you are now faced with far more reading choices than ever. Thousands more choices in any genre or style or cross-over than you could imagine. Self-published mingled with small presses mingled with traditional offerings from large houses—sometimes hard to tell apart unless you really do your research.

For you, the reader, is that good or bad? Again…it depends.

The very idea of all those self-published books out there, with no quality controls at all, just flung out there willy-nilly by anyone with a computer and the ability to type, may fill you with a nameless dread. They’re bound to be chock full of mistakes and bad writing, right? If they weren’t, their authors would get a real publishing contract, wouldn’t they?

I won’t lie. That’s probably true for some of the books out there. But let me ask you something. If you’ve mainly been reading the popular current fiction, or genre fiction put out by traditional houses, do you ever start to feel a little…let down? As though you’re reading the same thing over and over? Do those books ever seem a little bland and predictable?

As a reader myself, I had frankly been growing less and less enthusiastic about reading. I even noticed something strange I was starting to do. I would read a book all the way until the last couple of chapters and then quit. I wasn’t hating the book, and I had stuck with it that long. But there didn’t even seem any reason to read the last chapter, because without even reading it, I could tell you exactly what was going to happen to wrap things up.

As I started going to writers’ conferences—where we were warned about the evils of self-publishing and not “learning our craft”—one of the teachers on writing romantic suspense basically gave a laundry list of what a romantic suspense book must contain. (For example, the heroine has to be in a certain age range, and she must have an interesting profession.) In the climax, the heroine must be backed into a corner and her life endangered by the villain, and her hero must come to her aid, but she must not be passive. She should find a way to escape or to at least help overcome the villain. And then she and the hero come together in triumph and love.

Then I realized—that’s why I was putting those books down when I reached the predictable ending.

That’s also why my romantic suspense book, in which I tried to dash people’s expectations of the predictable ending, was getting turned down with suggestions for rewrites.

As blogger Jack Woe wrote, “A publisher’s job is to sell books. It’s safer to choose books that fit into the current trend than to take a chance, even though the chances tend to create trends when they’re successful…I don’t want to read the same story over and over and over again, only written by different authors. I want something new.”

Of course, as Hugh Howey points out, when you look at traditional vs. self-published books, you’re comparing “the tip of one iceberg (the books that made it through the gauntlet and into bookstores) with an entire iceberg (all self-published books).” In other words, readers now become the judges of what’s good and what they should read—but that means they’re faced with that huge slush pile that publishers usually wade through for them.

But there is more good news for readers. First of all, with Amazon ebooks, you can sample the books for free and check out whether the story grabs you, or whether it’s poorly written. Many times, you can get the whole book for free, or for a very low price. It’s a lot less of a commitment to sample and look for that one shining gem.

And instead of picking up a book in a store and seeing nothing but the blurbs and descriptions the publisher wanted to see, we now have reader reviews! If a book is poorly written, some reviewer is going to tell you so. And if a book can rise to the top of an Amazon list and be self-published, you know that book has something special, probably something new and refreshing, that’s grabbing readers’ attention.

So yes, as both a reader and an author, I’m excited about the new world of publishing.

What do you think? Have you read any self-published books? What have your reading experiences been—good or bad?

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