Category Archives: Summer’s Winter

“So…are you still writing?”

Kitten sleeping on keyboard
By Remedios44 [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons
A lot of people have asked me lately whether I’m still writing.

I can understand why. It’s been around three years since I published Jordan’s Shadow—and I haven’t even blogged or sent out a newsletter for ages. You very seldom even hear from me on Facebook. So no wonder the questions, in an age where most writers put out more than one book every year.

So, if you’re one of the ones who still cares—THANK YOU!!!! I’m so grateful you even remember I’m a writer. And second, here’s the answer: YES!…I think…maybe…I hope.

I’ve been in sort of a weird place about writing for a while now.

Working full-time and having the usual family responsibilities plus being one of the main caretakers for my elderly mother leaves me very little time and energy for anything to do with writing, and for a long time after publishing Summer’s Winter and Jordan’s Shadow, most of my energy went into marketing efforts and outreach on those two books. I got way behind on producing any writing, even though I was trying to limp along. So I decided to stop marketing for a period of time and devote myself to writing. And I’ve genuinely been doing that.

I always intended Summer’s Winter to be a trilogy, and I’ve been tackling book two. (Summer’s Fall. Yep, trouble’s definitely brewing.) I’ve honestly made myself stick to a weekly word count better than in the past.

I’d forgotten, though, how long it takes to write a novel absolutely from scratch, because I’d been working on those two (plus one or two more) for years. I’ve managed about 90,000 words of Summer’s Fall.

But honestly, I’ve had a lot of issues with writing beyond finding time and producing words. My relationship with writing is not what it used to be, and I’m spending a lot of time evaluating my supposed “calling” as a writer. And if I have one, what exactly that means.  And could I actually NOT finish this book after spending a couple of years on it and producing about 90,000 words? And how many of those words are actually any good?

I hope to start blogging again, and keeping everyone up to date. And again, if you’re one of the folks who is still interested and has asked, I truly appreciate you! I try to remind myself that writing Jordan’s Shadow seemed impossible, too, but I actually ended up loving the finished book. Here’s hoping!

 

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A new Poldark means…a new Warleggan.

Aidan Turner as Poldark.

Photo from pbs.org.

I’ve loved the Poldark saga for decades now. Fell in love with the original series, read all the books.

And now I’m on Cloud Nine because not only is there a new production of Poldark for Masterpiece/PBS/BBC, but it’s starring Aidan Turner as Poldark.  I can pretend I’m watching Jamie from Summer’s Winter on an acting job, because Aidan Turner comes closest to my mental picture of Jamie.

But for now…let’s talk George Warleggan.

I’m enjoying the new Poldark adaptation and most of the actors, but I’m having a hard time with the new Warleggan. Not because Jack Farthing doesn’t seem to be a perfectly capable actor, but first, because he seems miscast. George Warleggan, the slimy nemesis to Ross Poldark, was described by author Winston Graham as always looking too stocky and bullish for his elegant clothes–as though he never could escape his common blacksmith origins.

Ralph Bates as George Warleggan in the 1970s adaptation of the Poldark saga.

Ralph Bates, in the 1970s adaptation, was in my humble opinion, perfect. Cold, calculating–and physically powerful. Yes, he could have come from a family of blacksmiths.

And now, take a look at the new Warleggan. He looks and acts like nobility, like an elegant fop. This character does NOT communicate to me a man who is so insecure about his low-class roots that he’s never comfortable in his expensive, tailed clothes–and that he’s consumed with envy of the Poldarks and their ilk.
George Warleggan played by Jack Farthing in new PBS/Masterpiece/BBC production of Poldark.In last night’s episode, I also had trouble with the implication that he was consorting with a Truro lady of ill repute. In the novels (and earlier adaptation), one of the things that telegraphed George’s coldness was his frigidity around women. Except for wanting to take an elegant woman of the higher classes for his wife as a sort of trophy, he really wasn’t interested.  George Warleggan wouldn’t be caught dead with a common, well…you know.

I just looked at the two Warleggan pictures I shared. At least they both look surly. 🙂

Are you watching the new Poldark? What do you think?

 

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